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  John Sisko | Sep-Oct 2013, Vol 44, No 5
  Suzanne Vertel | Jul-Aug 2013, Vol 44, No 4
  Charles M. Carrillo | May-Jun 2013, Vol 44, No 3
  Bruce Herman | Mar-Apr 2013, Vol 44, No 2
  Lucinda Naylor | Jan-Feb 2013, Vol 44, No 1
  Tatiana Romanova-Grant | Nov-Dec 2012, Vol 43, No 6
  David Lee Csicsko | Mar-Apr 2012, Vol 43, No 2
  Janet McKenzie | Jan-Feb 2012, Vol 43, No 1
  Linda Dabeau | Nov-Dec 2011, Vol 42, No 6
  Jeremy Rudd | Sep-Oct 2011, Vol 42, No 5
  Pamela T. Hardiman | Jul-Aug 2011, Vol 42, No 4
  Sheila Mahoney Keefe | May-Jun 2011, Vol 42, No 3
  Michael Myers | Mar-Apr 2011, Vol 42, No 2
  Art Siegel | Sep-Oct 2010, Vol 41, No 5
  Alexander Tylevich | Jul-Aug 2010, Vol 41, No 4
  House of the Church Consultants | May-Jun 2010, Vol 41, No 3
  Chris Botti | Mar-Apr 2010, Vol 41, No 2
  John Giuliani | Jan-Feb 2010, Vol 41, No 1
  Jerzy Kenar | Nov-Dec 2009, Vol 40, No 6
  Anthony Visco | Sep-Oct 2009, Vol 40, No 5
  Elizabeth Devereaux | Jul-Aug 2009, Vol 40, No 4
  David Seagraves | May-Jun 2009, Vol 40, No 3
  Jeff and Anna Koh-Varilla | Mar-Apr 2009, Vol 40, No 2
  Stephen A. Remmert | Jan-Feb 2009, Vol 40, No 1
  David Cahoon | Nov-Dec 2008, Vol 39, No 6
  George Hoelzeman | Sep-Oct 2008, Vol 39, No 5
  Inspired Artisans, Ltd. | Jul-Aug 2008, Vol 39, No 4
  Margaret Adams Parker | Mar-Apr 2008, Vol 39, No 2
  Jay Hall Carpenter | Jan-Feb 2008, Vol 39, No 1
  Teresa Clark | Sep-Oct 2007, Vol 38, No 5
  Trappist Monks | Jul-Aug 2007, Vol 38, No 4
  Madeleine van den Hurk-Paul | Mar-Apr 2007, Vol 38, No 2
  Joseph Malham | Jan-Feb 2007, Vol 38, No 1
Timothy P. Schmalz | Nov-Dec 2006, Vol 37, No 6
Filex Msalu | Sep-Oct 2006, Vol 37, No 5
Maria Laughlin | Jul-Aug 2006, Vol 37, No 4
EverGreene | May-Jun 2006, Vol 37, No 3
Alison Aragon | Mar-Apr 2006, Vol 37, No 2
 
 
 
John Sisko | Sep-Oct 2013, Vol 44, No 5
When John Sisko’s sculpture of Pope John XXIII was unveiled, the members of St. James Cathedral, Seattle, Washington, viewed an image of the pope with outstretched hands that signaled openness, welcome, and prayer. The shrine honoring Blessed Pope John XXIII was finished nearly a year ago, just before the fiftieth anniversary of the opening of the Second Vatican Council. As with other work the sculptor has done for the Church, it evolved after conversations about art and the type of image desired. Sisko sculpts more often for the secular world than the religious but prefers to do sacred art. “The Catholic projects,” he said, “tend to be involved and intellectually challenging.” Sisko has had a broad education. His bachelor’s degree is in philosophy, and he studied art with an artist whose degree was in divinity. Besides creating art, he writes and edits for Sculpture Review. He said the magazine is planning an issue on Vatican II and art. More information is available at http://www.siskoworks.com/.
Susanne Vertel | Jul-Aug 2013, Vol 44, No 4
Susanne Vertel tells people that it is never too late to pursue a dream. After all, it was not until she was married with four children that she took her first art class at a community center. Not long after that first class, Susanne's husband died and she enrolled at the California College of Arts and the Scottsdale Artists School, where artists shared their techniques. Having grown up Roman Catholic, the lives of the saints are part o her spiritual core. Her art passes on images of Mary and the saints to which many can relate. A sculpture of a barefoot pregnant Mary carrying grapes portrays a woman who is in awe with an earthy quality. In a sculpture in which a toddler Jesus is carried in a sling on his mother's back, Mary as a free spirit is portrayed in love with her child. More images of Vertel's work may be seen at http://svertelstudios.com/.
Charles M. Carrillo | May-Jun 2013, Vol 44, No 3
Having earned a doctorate in anthropology, with a concentration in Spanish colonial archaeology, Charles M. Carrillo was part of a team excavating a chapel in New Mexico. During the excavation of Santa Rosa de Lima chapel, built in 1734, he was drawn to the images of the santos, or saints. First, he paid attention to them in an academic sense as he researched them. But as he was drawn into the culture of his ancestors, his interest turned to a passion for the santeros, or “saint makers,” and then to a vocation. For more than 32 years, he has carved and painted the images of the saints, rediscovering the traditional methods as he went along. The wood is native, usually Ponderosa pine and the colors of his paints are made from natural ingredients. He has, he said, revived an art form that had been lost for a hundred years. More information is available at www.collectorsguide.com/santos.
Bruce Herman | Mar-Apr 2013, Vol 44, No 2
Bruce Herman's work includes depictions of Christ carrying the Cross and suffering on the Cross, as well as the young Virgin Mary and the contemplative older Mary. "Behold, Your Mother" and "Miriam, Virgin Mother" are among the titles of his works. His pieces appear at the Vatican Museum of Religious Art and the San Paolo Monastery, Orvieto, Italy. Still, he does not think of his work as particularly religious art. Rather, he considers all art as religious. He says that he cannot separate the spiritual from a piece of art, just as he cannot compartmentalize parts of his life. "My art and my faith have been intertwined since I was six years old," he said. "What prompts me to make art is the desire to respond faithfully and fittingly to the beauty around me." Beauty, though, does not equate to what is pretty. "Beauty, goodness, and truth are expressions of God's being," Herman said. He holds the Lothlórien Distinguished Chair in Fine Arts at Gordon College, Wenham, Massachusetts. His work can be seen at http://bruceherman.com/.
Lucinda Naylor | Jan-Feb 2013, Vol 44, No 1
As a young child, Lucinda Naylor showed her fascination with labyrinths by building them with her wooden blocks. As an adult, Naylor has walked the Camino de Santiago in Spain and understands the labyrinth as a prayerful walk that mirrors a pilgrimage. "I think that people have remarkable experiences in walking a labyrinth," she said, "because the body is engaged." Naylor first designed a labyrinth professionally in the 1990s when a church in Michigan commissioned her. Her labyrinths may be designed for the interior of a church or on the grounds, as is the labyrinth she designed at the Basilica of St. Mary, Minneapolis. Usually the labyrinths are permanent, but for a retreat, she may design a temporary one. At retreats, too, she has taught participants to make finger labyrinths. Naylor's artistic range is wide. Her master of fine arts degree is in painting but she also draws and sculpts. Her work may be seen at www.LucindaNaylor.com.
Tatiana Romanova-Grant | Nov-Dec 2012, Vol 43, No 6
Iconographer Tatiana Romanova-Grant believes that an image can change a person's life. "Sometimes it's like a miracle the way a person experiences an icon," the Moscow-born artist said. Romanova-Grant, who now lives in San Francisco, seeks to write icons that will connect even with those who are unfamiliar with sacred art. When that connection is made, the icon lives within that person, she explained. "When people look at the image, they invest something of themselves. The icon—it starts to live its own life." Romanova-Grant studied at the Moscow Institute of Fine and Applied Arts Stroganovskoe. Her work with icons began with the restoration of art from the thirteenth to eighteenth centuries. Examples of her pieces are at http://spiritualpaintings.com/.
Daivd Lee Csicsko | Mar-Apr 2012, Vol 43, No 2
When David Lee Csicsko was asked to make Stations of the Cross for a church, the depictions of the people in the stations resembled the makeup of the Haitian/Hispanic parish. The Chicago resident said that he likes to be sure that his work fits in with the community. He also likes his liturgical art to be a catalyst for serious thinking. When Csicsko did a series on the saints, he aimed at exploring their tougher side. Sometimes, though, he wants to create a serene environment as he did with the windows of the chapel at Children's Hospital in Chicago. For more information, visit the artist's website, www.csicsko.com.
Janet McKenzie | Jan-Feb 2012, Vol 43, No 1
Vermont artist Janet McKenzie believes it is her vocation to to create sacred art that includes people who are not usually depicted in such art. Her oil paintings on canvas, then, primarily show people of color and women. But her art is not meant for any one group. She is interested in the interior journey of all. "I hope that the paintings lead people to go within themselves to that universal place that we all share," she said. Motherhood is one focus of her work, and many of her pieces are of Mary and Jesus. Some of these images have appeared on the cover of America magazine. Her traveling exhibit "Holiness and the Feminine Spirit" will be going around the United States through 2013. It is sponsored by the Hagerty Museum of Art, Marquette University. The artist's website is www.JanetMcKenzie.com.
Linda Dabeau | Nov-Dec 2011, Vol 42, No 6
Sculptor Linda Dabeau's cross-cultural heritage influences her work as a liturgical artist. Having been born in Dallas, Texas, and having spent formative years in Latin America, she has been steeped in the economic extravagance of central Texas and the romantic sacred mysteries of pre-Columbian civilizations and traditional Hispanic Catholicism of Central America. The Albuquerque resident customizes sculptures in varied media, working in bronze, stone, fired clay, cast metals, glass, and wood. In working with parishes, she seeks to create works that are both approachable and that connect with community members. She may be reached at ldabeau at swep dot com.
Jeremy Rudd | Sep-Oct 2011, Vol 42, No 5
For years Jeremy Rudd, assistant professor of art at Divine Word College in Dubuque, Iowa, created contemporary wooden abstract sculptures and designed and built furniture. More recently, he has been commissioned to do work for churches. Now he has designed and built a suspended cross for a chapel, made a corpus of cast metal, carved a wooden corpus for a processional cross, and designed and built credence and other liturgical tables. He is currently working on 22 16-inch low-relief plaques for an outdoor sculpture garden. Although his liturgical pieces veer away from his abstract style, he incorporates abstract elements to allow the viewer to penetrate the surface of the person portrayed. "It's all about the emotive qualities of the figure," he said.
Pamela T. Hardiman | Jul-Aug 2011, Vol 42, No 4
Pamela T. Hardiman's work designing banners for liturgical spaces melds her creativity, spirituality, and love of sewing. Hardiman, who begged her mother to teach her to use the sewing machine before the age of ten, first designed liturgical fabric art nearly 25 years ago to enhance a vacant wall in her parish. Her fabric art focuses on three types of pieces—her Celebrate series of banners that may be carried in procession or remain stationary in the worship space; the Rejoice series, which are painted silk banners in a sail shape; and quilted banners. Hardiman is the coauthor of Raise the Banners High © Liturgy Training Publications. Her work may be found at www.pthardiman.com.
Sheila Mahoney Keefe | May-Jun 2011, Vol 42, No 3
Sheila Mahoney Keefe seeks to portray the beauty and mystery of God in art, drawing her audience into a contemplative space. The artist creates her work amid stillness and silence. The painter and print maker who makes her home in Santa Fe, New Mexico, carves into wood with a small chisel prior to painting. Her exhibition "Songs from Silence," mixed media works on wood, reflects the chanting of the Liturgy of the Hours. The Song of a Silent One, by Michael Clay, and The Parable of a Cherry Blossom, by Abbot Mark, are among the books that she has illustrated. Her work can be found at the El Potrero Trading Post's Web Site, www.potrerotradingpost.com.
Michael Myers | Mar-Apr 2011, Vol 42, No 2
Each day, people touch the hands of the squatting Saint Francis of Assisi sculpture in the park at the Bishop Moreno Pastoral Center in the Diocese of Tucson. Some hold the raised, imploring fingers as they pray; others more casually touch the hands. "People feel very connected to it," said sculptor Michael Myers, who created the piece. Myers aims for his bronze sculptures to penetrate the emotions, showing the humanity of his subjects. Myers, a University of Arizona graduate with a bachelor of fine arts degree, has a studio at his home in Prescott, Arizona. His work can be seen at MichaelMyersStudios.com.
Art Siegel | Sep-Oct 2010, Vol 41, No 5
When Art Siegel builds a manger for a parish, he considers the architecture of the church building, the figures for the Nativity scene that the parish uses, input from the parish, and personalizing touches. The Lockport, Illinois, resident began Artistic Endeavors: Imaginative Designs and Construction after he was asked to build a Nativity scene for a parish. He soon found that his art degree from the College of St. Francis blended well with his construction skills. The Nativity scenes are designed for easy assembly, dismantling, and storage. For more information, visit http://artisticendeavors-idc.com.
Alexander Tylevich | Jan-Feb 2010, Vol 41, No 4
No matter the site of the liturgical art, sculptor Alexander Tylevich considers how he can create a space that can connect people to God. Tylevich, who earned a master of architecture degree in his native Belarus, brings to his work a sense of how atmosphere can be created in a space. At the St. Thomas More Chapel at the University of St. Thomas, Minneapolis, he worked with an architect and liturgical consultant to form the space to be quiet and uplifting. For the Tree of Knowledge, a 40-foot outdoor sculpture at Regis University, he also sought a space of prayer. And whether the piece is of a saint, such as Thomas Beckett or Vincent de Paul, or a large sculpture, the layers of meaning are many. Tylevich's work can be seen at http://www.hillstream.com/tylevich/AT_works.html.
House of the Church Consultants | May-Jun 2010, Vol 41, No 3
Liturgical design consultants Rev. Thomas Paul and Rev. Richard Lundgren approach their projects with prayer in mind. The partners in the House of the Church Consultants have been called on when churches are being built or renovated as well as for prayer spaces in hospitals, convents, and gardens. They were the consultants for the prayer and worship spaces at the retirement community The Clare at Water Tower in Chicago, Illinois. "We believe in the importance of beautiful and well-designed spaces that support the prayer of the Church and personal prayer," said Paul. They work with the community that the prayer space will serve and also with the artists and architects. For more information, visit www.HouseOfTheChurch.com.
Chris Botti | Mar-Apr 2010, Vol 41, No 2
For as long as Chris Botti can remember, liturgical art has been part of the fabric of his life. The owner of Botti Studio of Architectural Arts, Inc., grew up with the centuries-old family business discussed at the dinner table. The family dates their business to the sixteenth century in Agropoli, Italy, where a branch is still located. Botti Studio designs stained-glass pieces, statuary, murals, woodwork, and pieces in bronze, marble, brass, and steel. It also reworks pieces for another part of the worship space, such as transforming a communion rail into a railing surrounding a baptistry. For more information, go to www.BottiStudio.com.
John Guliani | Jan-Feb 2010, Vol 41, No 1
When Father John Giuliani returned to artwork nearly two decades ago, he painted images of Mary, Christ, and the saints with Native American facial characteristics and dress. "Native Americans rejoiced in seeing their own image depicted in the Virgin Mary or Christ," Giuliani said. He added, "They were grateful to see their Native American culture depicted as Christian in Catholic churches." Giuliani, who attended Pratt Institute in New York before entering the seminary, modeled the images on Native Americans as a reparation for the way they have been treated. For more information, visit http://www.hillstream.com/JG_bio.html.
Jerzy Kenar | Nov-Dec 2009, Vol 40, No 6
Not long before Pope John Paul II came to Chicago in 1979, Jerzy Kenar met the pastor of Five Holy Martyrs Parish. With the Pope scheduled to celebrate Mass there, furnishings were needed for the outdoor liturgy. Kenar agreed to make the altar, cross, chair, and ambo—his first commission for a parish. Those pieces were of wood, but he also works in granite, stone, and bronze. The Polish-born artist has lived in Chicago since 1979. He views his art as helping people go deep within themselves to experience their faith. For more information on Kenar, visit www.JerzyKenar.com.
Anthony Visco | Sep-Oct 2009, Vol 40, No 5
As a student in Italy, Anthony Visco toured churches and shrines, surrounding himself with the masterpieces of Catholic art. Just as artists centuries ago sought to catechize through their work, so does Visco. He considers himself a vocational artist, trying to teach and evangelize through art. He hopes that his pieces become an extension of the mission of the parish. "We can use art and architecture to express redemption and salvation," said Visco, the founder of The Atelier for the Sacred Arts in Philadelphia. His paintings, bronze reliefs, and sculptures can be seen at www.AnthonyVisco.org.
Elizabeth Devereaux | Jul-Aug 2009, Vol 40, No 4
Elizabeth Devereaux brings an education in church art to her parish architectural glass projects. The founder of Devereaux Architectural Glass in Chico, California, she studied Christian iconography and religion and art in the United States at Pacific School of Religion in Berkeley, California. Since the founding of her company in 1969, she has done commissions for churches across the country. She aims for the designs to respond to the architecture, light, environment, and the client's desires. For more information, visit www.devglas.com/.
David Seagraves  | May-Jun 2009, Vol 40, No 3
The first piece that David Seagraves was commissioned to sculpt was of the Blessed Virgin Mary and her mother, Saint Anne. That drew the Saint Elizabeth, Illinois, resident to focus on figures. He aims for the images he sculpts in wood, bronze, and stone to show the nobility that God has bestowed on humankind. He draws on that nobility of spirit to show the connection between the divine and the human. A sculpture of the Annunciation, then, depicts Mary as awestruck. Another shows pain in Mary's face as she looks down on a city, acknowledging the sorrows of the world. For more information, visit www.DavidSeagraves.com/.
Jeff and Anna Koh-Varilla | Mar-Apr 2009, Vol 40, No 2
The boyishness of a young Jesus, the innocence of Maria Goretti, and the concern of Mary Magdalene all are seen in the depictions of those people of faith that Jeff and Anna Koh-Varilla have sculpted. Until St. Raphael Parish commissioned a processional cross, the Chicago couple admired Renaissance church artists but felt unworthy to work in religious art. More than 13 years later, their realistic sculptures of religious figures are at the Cathedral of St. John the Evangelist in Milwaukee and many other parishes. Their work can be viewed at www.KohVarillaGuild.com.
Stephen A. Remmert | Jan-Feb 2009, Vol 40, No 1
Liturgical furnishings designer Stephen A. Remmert seeks to represent the story of a parish in its liturgical furnishings. Remmert listens intently as a community explains its heritage and the pieces they seek. "They should feel like they've designed the furnishings," he said. Remmert, who has a master's degree in religious studies from Boston College, began designing and crafting furniture full-time in 2000. The work melds his love of wood and liturgy. His pieces can be viewed at www.RemmertStudios.com.
David Cahoon | Nov-Dec 2008, Vol 39, No 6
Carpenter and deacon David Cahoon considers having crafted the furniture for the papal Mass in Nationals Stadium "an honor and a blessing." Cahoon's St. Joseph Carpentry Shop made the altar, papal chair, ambo, and lecterns for the Mass in April. Cahoon's business had included work in the secular sphere, however, prior to his 1991 ordination, he merged his profession with his vocation and concentrated his carpenter's skills on work for churches. The business does all types of woodwork restoration and renovation as well as crafting furniture. With a sawmill as part of the shop, wood is taken from the raw form to the finished product.
George Hoelzeman | Sep-Oct 2008, Vol 39, No 5
With a decision to design liturgical art and furnishings, George Hoelzeman combined his passions of woodworking, theology, and art. Hoelzeman, a former Benedictine candidate for the priesthood at St. Joseph Seminary College, St. Benedict, Louisiana, has bachelor's degrees in religion and history and a master's degree in medieval art history. His family roots in carpentry go back generations. Working with parishes, he incorporates liturgical catechesis and formation. Hoelzeman's work can be seen at www.grhstudios.com.
Inspired Artisans, Ltd.  | Mar-Apr 2008, Vol 39, No 2
Through Inspired Artisans, Ltd., work as varied as bronze sculptures, carvings in mahogany, metalwork, and mosaics, are designed, made, and installed at parishes, cemeteries, and monasteries. For a monastery of the Poor Clares, the artists designed stained glass windows, an altar, ambo, sculptures, and a large screen divider. At a parish, the creative group designed the altar, painted images of saints, and collaborated with others in the design of the baptismal font. Peruvian-born Gianfranco Tassara founded the Milwaukee-based company in 1997. Work from Inspired Artisans, Ltd., can be found at www.inspiredart.com.
Margaret Adams Parker | Mar-Apr 2008, Vol 39, No 2
In sculptures and woodcuts, Margaret Adams Parker seeks to convey the power of a story. She wants her audience to explore not only the biblical narrative the piece represents but the humanity of the individual portrayed. In her sculpture of Mary, she shows youth and vulnerability. Her woodcuts of the book of Ruth portray how God acts through ordinary people. Through the woodcuts of the Stations of the Cross, she depicts the spiritual and physical struggle of Christ as he carried the cross. The artist teaches theological aesthetics at Virginia Theological Seminary. For more information on her work, visit www.MargaretAdamsParker.com.
Jay Hall Carpenter | Jan-Feb 2008, Vol 39, No 1
When Jay Hall Carpenter sculpts a historical figure, he tries to capture a moment. The figure of Saint Thomas More at St. Anne Parish in Barrington, IL, depicts More's decision to defy the king. In sculpting the dozen saints and Old Testament personages for the parish, Carpenter researched individuals, costumes, and time periods. Details of Saint Joan of Arc's armor were taken from historical armor from that time. For Mother Francis Cabrini's habit, he viewed the one displayed at St. Cabrini High School in New York City. For more information on the sculptor, visit JayHallCarpenter.com.
Teresa Clark | Sep-Oct 2007, Vol 38, No 5
To capture Mother Theodore Guerin's personality in a sculpture, Teresa Clark read the journals of the foundress of the Sisters of Providence of St. Mary of-the-Woods and talked to members of the order. From the six-foot clay model that Teresa scultped, Nick Fairplay, Oberlin, Ohio, carved a limestone sculpture for Mary's Garden near the Basilica of the National Shrine of the Immaculate Conception, Washington, D.C. Dedication of the sculpture is planned for the fall. The artist's work can be seen at www.ClarkDesignLTD.com.
Trappist Monks | Jul-Aug 2007, Vol 38, No 4
The values of the monastic life—integrity, simplicity, and reverence for nature—are reflected in the caskets and urns the Trappist monks at New Melleray Abbey craft. The monks at the abbey in Peosta, Iowa, make the oak and walnut caskets principally from the trees they chop down from their sustainable forest (125 trees are planted for each tree removed from the forest). The caskets and urns are shipped around the country, often with next-day delivery. For more information, call 888-433-6934 or visit
http://www.TrappistCaskets.com/whoweare.htm.
Madeleine van den Hurk-Paul | Mar-Apr 2007, Vol 38, No 2
In designing vesture and accents for the altar and sanctuary, Madeleine van den Hurk-Paul, seeks to inspire assemblies with beauty. Considering herself a consultant, the Kitchener, Ontario, Canada, resident works with parishes to design pieces that will be personal to the worship space. “You should never do the piece again,” she said. Her customers are in both Canada and the United States. She designed 50 sets of vestments, each unique in appearance, for the principal concelebrants at the Archdiocese of Chicago Jubilee celebration in 2000. More information is available at her Web site, www.circlingspirit.com.
Joseph Malham | Jan-Feb 2007, Vol 38, No 1
Joseph Malham teaches icon writing at St. Gregory the Great Church, Chicago, Illinois, where he is one of three artists-in-residence. The iconographer studied art in Rome and iconography under Meltem Aktas. Churches commission Joseph to write icons for liturgies, shrines, and private devotions as well as on processional banners. He believes that icons speak a universal language that all can appreciate. Joseph uses egg tempera, bass panels, and 24K gold leaf in the icons. His icons may be viewed at www.stgregory.net.
Timothy P. Schmalz | Nov-Dec 2006, Vol 37, No 6
Timothy P. Schmalz, from Kitchener, Ontario, created bronze sculptures for St. John's Church in Streamwood, Illinois. Inside the church are a life-size Holy Family, a bas relief of Christ with children, and the Stations of the Cross. Outside the church are a Crucifixion scene and a sculpture of Saint John the Evangelist on his symbol, the eagle. Planned for the site are 21 bas reliefs, each representing a chapter of the Gospel of John. Among the depictions here are the images of the Woman at the Well, the Man Born Blind, and the Raising of Lazarus. The Web site for St. John's is http://www.mystjohns.com/. Timothy's Web site is http://www.sculpturebytps.com/.
Filex Msalu | Sep-Oct 2006, Vol 37, No 5
Filex Msalu, Arusha, Tanzania, knew at an early age that he wanted to be part of the art world. Together with artist Paulo Saleko, and at the suggestion of a missionary pastor, he designs a variety of Christian subject matter for the liturgical year. At Sunset Art Studio, the 33-year-old creates batiks with Christian themes. He has exhibited in Tanzania, Italy, and in the United States, and his batiks are found worldwide. Commissions can be requested via Sham Joachim at sjolengot@yahoo.com.
Maria Laughlin | Jul-Aug 2006, Vol 37, No 4
Maria Laughlin is a Seattle-based artist and photographer. She works primarily in scratchboard, a medium in which the artist uses a stylus to remove layers of ink from a claycoated board. The result is reminiscent of traditional woodcuts or steel engravings. Maria has done work for St. James Cathedral in Seattle and Catholic Community Services of Western Washington. The faces of the saints in her work suggest stillness and prayer. For more information, e-mail mlaughlin@stjames-cathedral.org.
EverGreene | May-Jun 2006, Vol 37, No 3
EverGreene's artists, artisans, and craftsmen are accomplished in all aspects of art applied to architecture, including murals, decorative painting, and more. Over the last quarter-century, Jeff Greene, founder of EverGreene Painting Studios, has nurtured artists, conservators, and craftspeople from all over the world who share his innovative spirit and passion for excellence. Their diverse talents come together in the studio and in the field to continue the evolution of traditional craftsmanship and design. EverGreene offers comprehensive services: conservation of original materials, restoration or replication of damaged or lost artwork and ornament, and creation of new architectural ornament in harmony with its setting. Find out more at www.evergreene.com.
Alison Aragon | Mar-Apr 2006, Vol 37, No 2
Alison Aragon, a New Mexico native, currently lives in Albuquerque, where she creates life-size, full-figure bronzes and bronze miniatures for churches. Her work has evolved from commissioned portrait busts in clay or bronze and life-size portrait drawings in full color or duotone to larger works for churches. She loves to explore the rich subjects of the saints and people significant to Christian faith. Her strength lies in her ability to show human expression and the elegance of the human form as she brings a contemporary interpretation to Christian themes. Contact her at JudithAAragon@aol.com.
 
     
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